Child, Teen & Young Adult Therapists in Lansdale, PA

Image of child and mother learning about Handspring online.

Get your child the treatment they need, without a wait

Full-time pediatric therapists in Lansdale, PA specially trained to treat ages 10-24
Insurance accepted
See a therapist in Lansdale within 10 days
Start with a free intro call and develop a unique care plan for your child
Image of child and mother learning about Handspring online.

Find The Best Therapists for Children, Teens, and Young Adults in Lansdale, PA

Finding the best therapists for children, teens, and young adults in Lansdale, PA is important in ensuring the highest quality of care and treatment options for their emotional and mental health needs. Parents and caregivers in Lansdale, Pennsylvania can find a wealth of mental health services and professionals who specialize in providing the expert care and support needed to address a wide range of mental health concerns, including anxiety, depression, ADHD, self-esteem issues, OCD, and more.

At Handspring, our team of full-time pediatric therapists in Lansdale, PA provides virtual mental health services grounded in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for children, adolescents, and young adults in Lansdale, PA between the ages of 10 and 24. Start with a free intro call, and learn how Handspring can provide essential treatment for your child and equip them with lifelong skills that empower their success.

Meet Handspring’s Pediatric Therapists in Lansdale, PA

Not all therapists are specially-trained pediatric therapists. Handspring’s are. Our pediatric therapists in Lansdale, PA are passionate professionals committed to enabling children and adolescents to overcome obstacles and flourish as human beings.

Therapy can help kids and teens understand the world around them, feel empowered, value themselves, challenge and change problematic behaviors, acquire the skills to overcome life’s challenges, and appreciate their unique identity.

Recovery from trauma experienced at an early age is greatly facilitated by love and support. Handspring’s pediatric therapists are equipped with the skills to identify potential triggers in a child’s environment and work to reduce their impact.
1
Molly Cohen, LCSW

Expertise in Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, and Parenting

Molly collaborates with clients to create a safe, affirming space where challenging thoughts, feelings and experiences can be explored. She practices therapy that is evidence-based and draws on approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based techniques, and parent consultation. Molly's goal is to empower clients with education and tools needed to continue experiencing success without therapy. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with experience providing therapy to children, teens and families in community-based, school and outpatient settings.Outside of work, Molly enjoys practicing yoga, being outdoors, and spending time with family and friends.

2
Megan Pelko, LPC

Expertise in Anxiety, Emotional Dysregulation

Megan is passionate about her work with individuals and families having difficulties with anxiety, emotional dysregulation, and communication. She mainly utilizes cognitive behavioral strategies and relaxation techniques, but utilizes other approaches based on the needs of the individual/family. Megan has experience in various outpatient settings working with children and parents, as well as adults. In her spare time, Megan can be found outdoors walking her dog or spending time with her family and friends.

3
Michael Rodriguez, LPC

Areas of expertise: trauma, mood disorders, emotional dysregulation

Michael is compassionate and driven to help you succeed and reach your goals. He has worked with individuals and families with trauma, emotional dysregulation, communication challenges, mood disorders and self-esteem. He will help you through your journey of change and growth through navigating the many challenges you face. He will use a blend of solution-focused, CBT, and person-centered treatment during your time in treatment. Michael has worked on school-based outpatient which allowed him to collaborate with the families, teachers, and other school staff to help the individuals he has served.In his spare time, Michael is spending time with his wife and 3 boys enjoying time outside and helping them discover new things. When he's not with them he takes some time to enjoy some gaming, Marvel movies, and anime.

4
Julianne Wiebalk, LPC

Areas of expertise: trauma, depression, behavioral challenges, co-occurring disorders

Julianne has dedicated over ten years to providing compassionate and empowering mental health care in both residential and community settings. She is formally trained in Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and has an approach rooted in strength-based interventions to promote healing and personal growth. Clients have successfully worked with Julianne to strengthen family connections, build healthy communication skills, increase emotional stability, and decrease self defeating behaviors. She believes that when clients are able to experience self-worth and self-efficacy they are able to achieve their personal, family, and academic goals. Outside of work, you can find Julianne on a hike, enjoying coffee with friends, or in a meditation class.

Megan Martino, LCSW

Expertise in Anxiety Disorders, OCD, Parenting, Grief and Loss

Read bio

Megan is passionate about evidence-based practice and uses cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based techniques, and parent training and education in her work. She recognizes the importance of flexibility and adapts her practice to meet the unique needs of each child and family.  Outside of work, Megan loves spending time with her family and being outdoors in the sunshine.

Megan Pelko, LPC

Expertise in Anxiety, Emotional Dysregulation

Read bio

Megan is passionate about her work with individuals and families having difficulties with anxiety, emotional dysregulation, and communication. She mainly utilizes cognitive behavioral strategies and relaxation techniques, but utilizes other approaches based on the needs of the individual/family. Megan has experience in various outpatient settings working with children and parents, as well as adults. In her spare time, Megan can be found outdoors walking her dog or spending time with her family and friends.

Molly Cohen, LCSW

Expertise in Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, and Parenting

Read bio

Molly collaborates with clients to create a safe, affirming space where challenging thoughts, feelings and experiences can be explored. She practices therapy that is evidence-based and draws on approaches such as cognitive behavioral therapy, mindfulness-based techniques, and parent consultation. Molly's goal is to empower clients with education and tools needed to continue experiencing success without therapy. She is a Licensed Clinical Social Worker with experience providing therapy to children, teens and families in community-based, school and outpatient settings.Outside of work, Molly enjoys practicing yoga, being outdoors, and spending time with family and friends.

Michael Rodriguez, LPC

Areas of expertise: trauma, mood disorders, emotional dysregulation

Read bio

Michael is compassionate and driven to help you succeed and reach your goals. He has worked with individuals and families with trauma, emotional dysregulation, communication challenges, mood disorders and self-esteem. He will help you through your journey of change and growth through navigating the many challenges you face. He will use a blend of solution-focused, CBT, and person-centered treatment during your time in treatment. Michael has worked on school-based outpatient which allowed him to collaborate with the families, teachers, and other school staff to help the individuals he has served.In his spare time, Michael is spending time with his wife and 3 boys enjoying time outside and helping them discover new things. When he's not with them he takes some time to enjoy some gaming, Marvel movies, and anime.

Julianne Wiebalk, LPC

Areas of expertise: trauma, depression, behavioral challenges, co-occurring disorders

Read bio

Julianne has dedicated over ten years to providing compassionate and empowering mental health care in both residential and community settings. She is formally trained in Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) and has an approach rooted in strength-based interventions to promote healing and personal growth. Clients have successfully worked with Julianne to strengthen family connections, build healthy communication skills, increase emotional stability, and decrease self defeating behaviors. She believes that when clients are able to experience self-worth and self-efficacy they are able to achieve their personal, family, and academic goals. Outside of work, you can find Julianne on a hike, enjoying coffee with friends, or in a meditation class.

We’re on a mission to make care affordable for all families, which is why we offer various payment methods: FSA, HSA, and out-of-network reimbursement.

Sessions cost $95 each. Clients can also pre-purchase a bundle of 10 sessions for $750. Bundles are non-transferable and non-refundable. These rates will be impacted once we begin accepting the client’s insurance provider.

To learn more, visit handspringhealth.com/pricing.

Families love Handspring

“Every aspect has been great so far. The onboarding process was quick and easy - everyone was so professional, responsive, and compassionate. Our child was quickly matched with a therapist with a suitable personality, style, and approach. My child used to dread therapy - now he looks forward to it!Additionally, the parents needs are being addressed as well - the option to have that support is invaluable!”

Handspring Mom, NJ

“My son is slowly warming up to counseling but we are making strides and I am seeing glimmers of progress. It’s been about 2 months and I am very happy with how things have gone so far and looking forward to continued progress as school starts.”

Handspring Mom, FL

“I have seen a huge improvement in the way my daughter communicates, manages her emotions, and behaves since she started her weekly sessions. I am so grateful to see such a positive impact with her and within a short period of time. Tried other solutions and none worked. Thankful for Handspring services helping our family.”

Handspring Mom, NJ

What We Treat

Our licensed therapists and psychologists in Lansdale, PA can help with the following:

Anxiety & Worries
Social anxiety
Generalized anxiety
Panic attacks
Specific phobias
Depression & Mood
Sadness
Irritability
Loneliness
Withdrawal
Behavioral Difficulties
Tantrums
Defiance
Obsessions
OCD
Adjustments & Transitions
Transition to school
Transition to camp
Bullying
Trauma
Meet Handspring

Our Approach

Expert Care
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Licensed therapists and psychologists in Lansdale, PA specially trained to work with children and young adults (ages 10-24).

Backed by clinical evidence
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Our approach is rooted in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Behavioral Parent Training (BPT), two gold-standard treatments that have been clinically proven to work.

Tailored to your child
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No two children are the same, which means no two care plans are either — the length of treatment varies based on your family’s needs and goals.

Designed to empower
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Therapists in Lansdale provide children (and families) with specific tools to empower resilient, fulfilling lives.

Flexible scheduling, zero waitlists
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See a therapist in Lansdale, PA as little as one week. And with sessions offered virtually, you can access care when and where you need it most.

Collaborative
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Parents and caregivers are involved in every step of the process and respected as critical partners in helping each child thrive.

How it works

Start Therapy Easily and Affordably

Handspring makes it easy to get started with therapy in Pennsylvania. Your first consultation is free. Use your insurance and pay a nominal copay for every session after that. Not covered? Sessions are $95 each and come with the same holistic approach and support.

Start with a free consultation
30-60 min

What to expect:

Parents meet with Handspring's intake team to discuss what brings them here, and get matched to a Handspring therapist in Lansdale, PA.

Step Number 1
Meet with your Handspring therapist
90 min

What to expect:

The parent and their child meet with a Handspring therapist to understand the child’s strengths and needs to develop a treatment plan.

Step Number 2
Begin your mental health treatment
45-60 min/session

What to expect:

The child—and sometimes their parent(s)—attend sessions designed to build lifelong coping and confidence skills.

Step Number 3

We’re on a mission to make care affordable for all families, which is why we offer various payment methods: FSA, HSA, and out-of-network reimbursement.

Sessions cost $95 each. Clients can also pre-purchase a bundle of 10 sessions for $750. Bundles are non-transferable and non-refundable. These rates will be impacted once we begin accepting the client’s insurance provider.

To learn more, visit handspringhealth.com/pricing.

Locations In Montgomery County, PA

Abington
Abington
Ambler
Ambler
Ardmore
Ardmore
Audubon
Audubon
Bala Cynwyd
Bala Cynwyd
Blue Bell
Blue Bell
Bridgeport
Bridgeport
Bryn Athyn
Bryn Athyn
Cedars
Cedars
Cheltenham
Cheltenham
Collegeville
Collegeville
Colmar
Colmar
Conshohocken
Conshohocken
Creamery
Creamery
Dresher
Dresher
Eagleville
Eagleville
East Greenville
East Greenville
Elkins Park
Elkins Park
Fairview Village
Fairview Village
Flourtown
Flourtown
Fort Washington
Fort Washington
Franconia
Franconia
Frederick
Frederick
Gilbertsville
Gilbertsville
Gladwyne
Gladwyne
Glenside
Glenside
Green Lane
Green Lane
Gwynedd
Gwynedd
Gwynedd Valley
Gwynedd Valley
Harleysville
Harleysville
Hatboro
Hatboro
Hatfield
Hatfield
Haverford
Haverford
Horsham
Horsham
Huntingdon Valley
Huntingdon Valley
Jenkintown
Jenkintown
King of Prussia
King of Prussia
Kulpsville
Kulpsville
Lafayette Hill
Lafayette Hill
Lansdale
Lansdale
Lederach
Lederach
Mainland
Mainland
Merion Station
Merion Station
Mont Clare
Mont Clare
Montgomeryville
Montgomeryville
Narberth
Narberth
Norristown
Norristown
North Wales
North Wales
Oaks
Oaks
Oreland
Oreland
Palm
Palm
Pennsburg
Pennsburg
Perkiomenville
Perkiomenville
Plymouth Meeting
Plymouth Meeting
Pottstown
Pottstown
Red Hill
Red Hill
Royersford
Royersford
Salford
Salford
Salfordville
Salfordville
Sassamansville
Sassamansville
Schwenksville
Schwenksville
Skippack
Skippack
Souderton
Souderton
Spring House
Spring House
Spring Mount
Spring Mount
Sumneytown
Sumneytown
Telford
Telford
Tylersport
Tylersport
West Point
West Point
Willow Grove
Willow Grove
Worcester
Worcester
Woxall
Woxall
Wyncote
Wyncote
Wynnewood
Wynnewood
Zieglerville
Zieglerville
Abington
Abington
Ambler
Ambler
Ardmore
Ardmore
Audubon
Audubon
Bala Cynwyd
Bala Cynwyd
Blue Bell
Blue Bell
Bridgeport
Bridgeport
Bryn Athyn
Bryn Athyn
Cedars
Cedars
Cheltenham
Cheltenham
Collegeville
Collegeville
Colmar
Colmar
Conshohocken
Conshohocken
Creamery
Creamery
Dresher
Dresher
Eagleville
Eagleville
East Greenville
East Greenville
Elkins Park
Elkins Park
Fairview Village
Fairview Village
Flourtown
Flourtown
Fort Washington
Fort Washington
Franconia
Franconia
Frederick
Frederick
Gilbertsville
Gilbertsville
Gladwyne
Gladwyne
Glenside
Glenside
Green Lane
Green Lane
Gwynedd
Gwynedd
Gwynedd Valley
Gwynedd Valley
Harleysville
Harleysville
Hatboro
Hatboro
Hatfield
Hatfield
Haverford
Haverford
Horsham
Horsham
Huntingdon Valley
Huntingdon Valley
Jenkintown
Jenkintown
King of Prussia
King of Prussia
Kulpsville
Kulpsville
Lafayette Hill
Lafayette Hill
Lansdale
Lansdale
Lederach
Lederach
Mainland
Mainland
Merion Station
Merion Station
Mont Clare
Mont Clare
Montgomeryville
Montgomeryville
Narberth
Narberth
Norristown
Norristown
North Wales
North Wales
Oaks
Oaks
Oreland
Oreland
Palm
Palm
Pennsburg
Pennsburg
Perkiomenville
Perkiomenville
Plymouth Meeting
Plymouth Meeting
Pottstown
Pottstown
Red Hill
Red Hill
Royersford
Royersford
Salford
Salford
Salfordville
Salfordville
Sassamansville
Sassamansville
Schwenksville
Schwenksville
Skippack
Skippack
Souderton
Souderton
Spring House
Spring House
Spring Mount
Spring Mount
Sumneytown
Sumneytown
Telford
Telford
Tylersport
Tylersport
West Point
West Point
Willow Grove
Willow Grove
Worcester
Worcester
Woxall
Woxall
Wyncote
Wyncote
Wynnewood
Wynnewood
Zieglerville
Zieglerville

Frequently asked questions

Services
What services do you provide?

We provide virtual therapy, also called online therapy, to children aged 10 and older, and to young adults 18-24.

What age range of clients do you currently see?

Our pediatric therapists in Lansdale, PA provide virtual therapy to kids aged 10 and older, and to young adults aged 18 and older. We will begin seeing younger kids later this year in our in-person clinics.

What challenges do you help with?

Our pediatric therapists in LansdaleLansdale are trained in evaluating and treating a wide range of conditions and concerns. These include anxiety, depression, disruptive behaviors, other mood disorders, impulse control, and adjustment disorders among others. Read more about our care model.

Where do you provide services?

We offer virtual treatment to children, young adults and families who live in Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Florida, North Carolina or New Jersey.

Do you prescribe medication or offer medication management support?

Not currently. While some children may need medication, we strongly believe in starting with psychotherapy and introducing medication only when clinically appropriate. We are taking a measured approach, and expect to offer medications later this year.

Billing
Do you accept insurance?

Yes! We currently accept United Healthcare and Independence Blue Cross for our Lansdale, PA clients. If your insurance is not covered, you may choose to submit for out-of-network reimbursement with your insurance company. If you would like to do so, we can provide a super-bill that you can attach to the submission. We provide no guarantee that your insurance company will reimburse you. We believe therapy should be affordable to all, and making it more accessible to more families is core to our mission. Stay tuned

How much are your services?

If you are using insurance, your out-of-pocket costs are dependent on your benefit plan. Most families using insurance pay between $20 and $40 per session. For clients paying out of pocket, all follow-up sessions cost $95 each.

How much does therapy cost in Lansdale, PA?

The cost of therapy in LansdaleLansdale, PA with other providers ranges from $100-$200 per session. With Handspring, if you are using insurance, your out-of-pocket costs are dependent on your benefit plan. Most families using insurance pay between $20 and $40 per session. For clients paying out of pocket, all follow-up sessions cost $95 each.

What forms of payments do you accept?

We collect credit/debit card details before sessions begin. Your card is charged after each session.

My insurance provides out-of-network benefits. Can you provide a superbill?
Therapy
When should children start seeing a therapist?

The appropriate age for a child to start therapy depends on their individual needs and circumstances. Parents should consider factors such as the child’s age, developmental level, and any existing mental health issues to ensure the best possible outcome. Evidence-based treatment can be sought if the child excels in multiple areas of life, displays positive mood and behavior changes, or exhibits constructive or cooperative behavior. Read our article "Handspring Health: Signs Your Child May Need a Therapist" for more tips.

What is the difference between a child psychiatrist and a child therapist?

While both child psychiatrists and child therapists aim to help children with mental health concerns, there are distinct differences between the two professions. A child psychiatrist is a medical doctor specializing in mental health diagnosis and treatment, providing effective medication. On the other hand, a licensed psychologist or child therapist is a mental health professional who offers talk therapy, creative play therapy, or empowering CBT to help children overcome issues such as childhood trauma.

What are the basics of child psychology?

Child psychology is a fascinating field that focuses on the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social development of children at different stages of their lives. It helps gain insight into their thought processes, emotions, and behaviors. Children’s development includes changes in height, weight, motor skills, problem-solving, memory, language, recognizing and expressing emotions, and interacting with others, building relationships, understanding social norms, and developing empathy.

Is it okay for a 13-year-old to go to therapy?

Yes, it's okay for a 13-year-old to go to therapy. It can be a safe space for them to explore their thoughts and emotions while providing invaluable support in areas such as self-discovery, stress, life events, or mental health and relationship issues. It can also offer the opportunity to develop effective coping strategies, enhance resilience, and identify and address any underlying issues causing distress.

What age is appropriate for counseling?

Counseling can be beneficial for children as young as two years old. For example, play therapy can be a great way to help kids aged 3 to 5 years. The appropriate age for counseling varies depending on the child’s individual needs and life circumstances, ensuring that they receive the most effective support possible.

How do I tell my child about counseling?

When discussing counseling with your child, it’s essential to use age-appropriate language and emphasize the positive aspects of therapy. Explain that counseling is a fantastic place where they feel empowered and can chat with a new friend and learn about their feelings. Be open and honest with your child about the purpose of counseling and reassure them that it's a safe space to share their thoughts and emotions.

Is it OK for a 12 year old to go to therapy?

Yes, therapy can be beneficial for 12-year-olds as it provides a safe place to foster healthy coping skills, learn to effectively express their emotions, and build confidence in themselves. Various therapy options, such as CBT, play therapy, family therapy, and commitment therapy, are available depending on their individual needs and concerns. These treatment methods can be assessed by a family therapist to help determine the most suitable approach.

What is LCSW?

LCSW stands for Licensed Clinical Social Worker. LCSWs are social workers who have earned a master’s degree in social work (MSW) and completed the necessary training and state licensure to provide clinical mental health services and therapy to individuals, families, and groups.

What is LPC?

LPC stands for Licensed Professional Counselor. They provide mental health services in various healthcare settings and work with individuals, families, and groups to address emotional, behavioral, and psychological challenges. Depending on the state, LPCs may also be called a licensed clinical professional counselor or licensed mental health counselor. To become an LPC, you must earn a Master’s in counseling or a related doctoral degree and obtain a state license before providing services.

What type of therapy is best for young adults?

The best type of therapy for young adults depends on their specific needs and concerns. CBT, interpersonal therapy, group therapy, and family therapy can all be helpful. These therapies can help young adults recognize and modify unfavorable thought patterns and behaviors, enhance communication and relationships, offer support and understanding from peers, and assist the entire family in working together to address issues. Each type has its own unique benefits and can be tailored to the individual’s needs. For example, CBT can help young adults identify and modify negative thought patterns.

What percentage of young adults go to therapy?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 23.2% of those aged 18–44 received mental health treatment in 2021. 10% of children aged 5–17 received counseling or therapy from a mental health professional in 2019.

Is it better to have a young or old therapist?

The ideal therapist depends on individual preferences and needs. Young therapists can provide a unique connection to younger clients, being familiar with the latest trends and issues that young people face. They are also likely to be open to fresh ideas and approaches to therapy. On the other hand, therapists with extensive experience can bring a wealth of knowledge and understanding, offering compassion towards the common challenges of aging, such as physical and mental health issues. The key is to find a therapist that you and your child can trust and feel comfortable with.

Can a therapist help with childhood trauma?

Yes, a therapist can help with childhood trauma by providing a safe and supportive environment for children to talk about their experiences. They can help children gain understanding and process their emotions, teach them skills to manage their thoughts and feelings, and address any underlying issues that may be causing distress. Through therapy, children can learn to communicate with others effectively, express their feelings, and modify their behavior.

What therapy is used for complex childhood trauma?

Psychotherapy, also known as talk therapy, is the main treatment for complex childhood trauma. Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR), and the development of strong coping mechanisms can also be effective in managing complex childhood trauma.

What kind of therapy is best for childhood trauma?

Therapies such as Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), Cognitive Processing Therapy (CPT), and Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing (EMDR) are highly successful in addressing childhood trauma. The best type of therapy for childhood trauma can be tailored to each individual’s specific needs and preferences, considering factors such as the severity of the trauma and the individual’s coping skills. For example, TF-CBT is often used to help children process and cope with traumatic experiences, while CPT is used to help individuals identify and challenge negative thoughts and beliefs related to the trauma. EMDR is used to help individuals reprocess traumatic memories and reduce the intensity of the associated emotions.

What psychologist deals with childhood trauma?

Psychologists who specialize in trauma-focused CBT can provide invaluable support for families affected and those dealing with childhood trauma. This type of therapy encourages individuals to process and understand their traumatic experiences in a positive way. They help children develop resilience, strength, and healthy coping skills while addressing any underlying issues that may be causing distress.

How do I start a therapy session with my child?

To start a therapy session with your child, create a safe and comforting atmosphere. Discuss with your child why they are there and what they can expect from the session. Encourage them to express any concerns they may have about counseling and reassure them that the therapist is there to help them navigate their issues and offer guidance. Tell your child know that it is okay to talk about their feelings and it is important to be honest. Read our article "How to Talk to Your Child About Starting Therapy" for more tips.

When should a child see a psychologist about anxiety?

A child should see a psychologist about anxiety when their symptoms are strong, persistent, and impacting their day-to-day life. Seeking professional help from a psychologist can provide valuable support and guidance to help children manage their anxiety and stress and improve their overall well-being. Psychologists can help children identify and understand their anxiety triggers, develop coping strategies, and build resilience. They can also provide guidance to parents on how to best support their child.

Why should a child see a psychologist?

A child should see a child psychologist to develop essential skills to cope with their problems and improve their well-being. Psychologists can provide invaluable assistance with learning, behavior, emotions, and mental health. They can offer support and guidance in various areas, such as managing emotions, learning coping strategies, and developing social skills.

What is the difference between a child psychologist and child psychotherapist?

A child psychologist and child psychotherapist both aim to help children with mental health concerns. Child psychologists typically have a doctoral degree in psychology and specialize in diagnosing and treating mental health issues. Child psychotherapists may have a master’s degree in psychology, social work, or counseling and specialize in helping children understand and express their feelings in a positive way. Botch child psychologists and child psychotherapists use evidence-based treatments such as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT).

How do I get my child to see a psychologist?

To encourage your child to see a psychologist, explain that therapy is a place where they can share their thoughts and feelings with a new friend. Use age-appropriate language and be open and honest with your child about the purpose of therapy, ensuring a safe place for them.

What age is adolescent psychotherapy?

Adolescent psychotherapy is designed for individuals between the ages of 13 and 19, focusing on empowering adolescents as they grow. It helps them develop positive coping skills, foster self-esteem, and learn how to effectively manage their emotions and stress.

What is the difference between child psychology and clinical child psychology?

Child psychology is a broad field that studies the mental processes of children and adolescents, while clinical child psychology is a specialty within child psychology focusing on helping children and adolescents by diagnosing and treating mental, emotional, and behavioral problems.

Is therapy worth it for kids?

Yes, therapy is worth it for kids. It can help kids reduce anxiety and depression, boost self-esteem, and improve coping and social skills and emotional intelligence. It can also help children learn to communicate with others effectively, express their feelings, modify their behavior, and hone problem-solving skills.

Is online therapy effective for kids?

Yes, online therapy can be effective for kids, particularly in treating symptoms of anxiety, depression, and trauma. It offers increased confidentiality and privacy, as well as the convenience of accessing therapy from anywhere. Online therapy can be more cost-efficient than traditional in-person therapy, making it an attractive option for many families.

Do I need to attend therapy with my child?

In some cases, it may be helpful for you to attend therapy sessions with your child so that the therapist can get to know you and your child better and help you work together to address the child's mental health concerns. In other cases, it may be more beneficial for you to attend sessions separately from your child. This can be helpful if you're struggling with your own mental health concerns or if you need help learning how to parent a child with mental health challenges. Ultimately, the decision is a personal one, and what works for one family member may not work for another. If you're unsure about whether or not you should attend sessions with your child, ask your child's therapist for advice.

How long are sessions with child therapists?

Your journey with Handspring starts with a free consult call. Once we understand what you're looking for, we'll match you with a therapist for a 90-minute assessment session during which your therapist takes the time to understand your child's strengths and needs and develop a treatment plan. This is followed by weekly 45 to 55-minute sessions, designed to equip your child with lifelong skills they can use to spring forward with confidence.

How can I tell if a therapist is a good fit for my child?

Ensure that the therapist is licensed and has appropriate qualifications to work with children. Look for credentials such as Licensed Clinical Social Worker (LCSW), Licensed Professional Counselor (LPC), or Psychologist (Ph.D. or Psy.D.). Consider therapists who also have experience treating the specific issues or challenges your child is facing. Pay attention to your child's comfort level and rapport with the therapist. Your child should feel safe and supported in the therapist's presence. Observe the therapist's communication style during initial consultations or sessions. The right therapist should involve both you and your child in the treatment process, be able to explain concepts in an age-appropriate manner, actively listen to your child's concerns, provide feedback, and offer guidance on how you can support your child's progress. We also recommend researching the therapist's reputation and online reviews.

What does therapy for teenagers look like?

Therapy for teens involves confidential one-on-one sessions with a licensed therapist. At Handspring, our highly-trained therapists use principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) and Behavioral Parent Training (BPT) to build on the unique strengths of each teen and family. Treatment is skills-based and focuses on resolving real-world problems in the short term and providing life-long skills to help youth confidently navigate future challenges. Our therapists involve parents and caregivers in every step of the process and respect them as critical partners in helping each child thrive.

How long does therapy for teenagers generally take to work?

The duration can vary based on several factors, including the concerns being addressed, the severity of the issues, the teenager's receptiveness to therapy, and the therapist's treatment approach. Therapy is not a quick fix and may take several weeks or months to show significant progress. Some teens may benefit from short-term therapy focused on specific goals, while others may require longer-term treatment for more complex issues. The therapist will regularly assess progress and make recommendations based on the teenager's needs. Remember: each individual's journey is unique and the duration of therapy can vary greatly.

How do you encourage a teenager to go to therapy?

Approach the conversation with empathy and patience. Clearly express your concerns about the teenager's well-being and explain how therapy can be beneficial in addressing their challenges. Discuss the idea of therapy as a common and positive resource for people of all ages. Highlight that seeking help is a sign of strength and self-care, emphasizing that many individuals benefit from professional support. Address any misconceptions or concerns the teen may have about therapy. Explain that therapists are there to provide support, guidance, and a safe place to explore their thoughts and emotions. If possible, allow the teen to participate in the selection of a therapist to increase the teen's sense of control and investment in the process. Let the teen know that you'll be there to support them throughout the process and reassure them that therapy is confidential. If the teenager is resistant, focus on building a supportive environment and maintaining open lines of communication until they are more receptive to the idea. You may also want to consider involving a trusted professional, such as a school counselor or pediatrician who can provide further insight and guidance.

How do you prepare teens for therapy?

Preparing teens for therapy involves creating a supportive environment and addressing their concerns. Strategies include discussing the benefits of therapy, normalizing the process, addressing concerns and misconceptions, emphasizing confidentiality, explaining the process, involving them in the decision-making, encouraging open communication, and offering reassurance and support. Each teen is unique, so it's important to tailor the preparation process to their individual needs. You may also want to consult with a Handspring licensed therapist for additional guidance on preparing a teen.

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